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Home > Tortoises > Stinkpot Turtle

Stinkpot Turtle

Stinkpot turtle is a species of turtle found only in southeastern Canada and Eastern United States. The species is almost entirely aquatic, spending most of its time in shallow, densely vegetated waters of slow moving ponds or creeks. It ventures onto land when females lay eggs or sometimes to bask. The turtle has the ability to release a foul smell from the scent glands located on the edge of its shell possibly to ward off predators. 



    Kingdom Animalia
    Phylum Chordata
    Subphylum Vertebrata
    Class Reptilia
    Order Testudines
    Family Kinosternidae
    Subfamily Kinosterninae
    Genus Sternotherus
    Scientific Name Sternotherus odoratus


    Other Names Common musk turtle
    Length Around 5.1–14 cm (2.0–5.5 in)
    Weight Around 603 g (1.329 lb)
    Color Brown or black upper surface; dark olive to black skin; two marked yellow lines one on either side of the eye runs from the snout to the neck
    Distribution Southern Ontario, southern Quebec (Canada); southern Maine, Florida, Texas, central Wisconsin (United States)
    Habitat Variety of wetland habitats and littoral zones, especially  shallow watercourses with a slow current and muddy bottom
    Diet Crayfish, freshwater clams, aquatic larvae, snails, tadpoles, various insects, fish, carrion
    Hibernation Fact Hibernate buried  in the mud under logs or in muskrat lodges
    Predators Juveniles fall prey to largemouth bass, bullfrogs and cottonmouths whereas adults are preyed upon by muskrats
    Breeding Season Spring
    Mode of Reproduction Oviparous (egg laying)
    Clutch Size 2 to 9 eggs
    Incubation Period 9 to 12 weeks
    Reproductive Age Males: 3 to 5 years of age
    Females: 5 to 11 years of age
    Average Lifespan More than 50 years in captivity
    IUCN Conservation Status Least Concern

    Stinkpot Turtle Pictures Gallery

    Published on January 27th 2017 by under Tortoises. Article was last reviewed on 24th July 2018.

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