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Home > Snakes > Ringneck Snake

Ringneck Snake

Ringneck snakes are small, slender, slightly venomous species of colubrid snakes found widely throughout the United States, southeastern Canada and central Mexico. Their nonaggressive nature rendered them harmless and easy to handle. Adult females are usually longer than males.



    Kingdom Animalia
    Phylum Chordata
    Subphylum Vertebrata
    Class Reptilia
    Order Squamata
    Suborder Serpentes
    Family Colubridae
    Subfamily Dipsadinae
    Genus Diadophis
    Scientific Name Diadophis punctatus


    Length 25–38 cm (10–15 in)
    Color Olive, brown, bluish-gray to black dorsal color with yellow, yellow orange or red neck band; yellow-orange to red ventral color with black spots along the margins; some populations lack the distinctive neck band and ventral color; head is a bit darker than the rest of the body
    Distribution Large parts of the United states (Gulf of Saint Lawrence, Gulf Coast of Texas, northern Minnesota, Iowa, eastern Nebraska, Kansas, Pacific Northwest, south-central Washington, western Idaho, southern Nevada, central Utah, Arizona), southeastern Canada, central Mexico
    Habitat Open woodlands, rocky hillsides, riparian and wetter environments with plenty of cover, flatland forests
    Diet Small salamanders, earthworms, slugs, lizards, frogs, other juvenile snake species
    Hibernation Fact Hibernates during winter months
    Predators Other snakes, wild hogs, opossums, armadillos, skunks, shrews, screech owls, bullfrogs
    Venom Fact Slightly venomous
    Breeding Season Spring or fall
    Mode of Reproduction Oviparous (egg laying)
    Clutch Size 3 to 10
    Reproductive Age 3 years of age
    Average Lifespan Longest in captivity: 6 years, 2 months
    In wild: More than 10 years, may be 20 years
    IUCN Conservation Status Least Concern

    Ringneck Snake Pictures Gallery

    Published on September 9th 2016 by under Snakes. Article was last reviewed on 30th March 2017.

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